Doctor of Education in Instructional Leadership

EdD in Instructional Leadership: Program Description

WCSU’s EdD in Instructional Leadership is the only doctorate of its kind in Connecticut and is one of approximately 16 doctoral programs in the country to focus on instructional leadership. The dynamic curriculum prepares educators, such as teachers, curriculum specialists, counselors, school psychologists, and administrators to create innovative learning environments; to respond to reform at the national, state and local levels and; to transform educational organizations. Graduates of this program will be able to apply advanced curricular systems and strategies in classrooms and schools.  The program will prepare teachers to be instructional leaders within their districts, able to assist with many decisions related to academics and assessment. More information can be found at www.wcsu.edu/EdD-Leadership .

Faculty members include Dr. Marcy Delcourt, Dr. Karen Burke, Dr. Nancy Heilbronner, and Dr. Gwen Olmstead. Their profiles can be found at www.wcsu.edu/edd-leadership

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Is this an accredited program?  This Doctor of Education in Instructional Leadership degree program is approved by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), the Connecticut Department of Higher Education (DHE), the Connecticut State Department of Education (CSDE), and the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC). 

Once accepted into the EdD in Instructional Leadership program, students may also enroll in the program to obtain a Certificate in Intermediate Administration and Supervision (Endorsement #092).  This certificate program is also accredited by the Connecticut DHE and the CSDE.  Additionally, it has received national accreditation from the Educational Leader Constituent Council (ELCC) of the National Policy Board for Educational Administrators (NPBEA) and from NCATE.  Please note that as State and national policies change, the programs will be updated accordingly.

2. What types of courses are offered? Based on the reflective practitioner model, all courses are designed to assist doctoral candidates in taking leadership roles to improve the curriculum and instruction in their classrooms, schools, and districts.  The EdD in Instructional Leadership at WCSU has three major components:

Leadership Theory and Foundation.  In one of our first courses of the program, students participate in a leadership exercise and construct an individualized Leadership Development Plan.  This plan acts as a blueprint for the acquisition and enrichment of leadership behaviors and skills.  Additionally, students develop individual, group, and organizational competencies throughout the program.

Area of Specialization.  Students investigate cognitive-developmental and socio-cultural theories and research-based strategies to design and modify classroom curricula as well as to create professional development experiences in schools.

Inquiry Strategies and Dissertation Sequence.  Doctoral students interpret and apply a full complement of in-depth research strategies to educational settings.  Students develop skills and extend their knowledge in the areas of evaluation, interpretation, and research implementation.

Courses included in each area are listed below.

Courses in the EdD in Instructional Leadership

Core Courses in Leadership Theory and Foundations

Area of Specialization

Inquiry Strategies and Dissertation Sequence

  1. ED800: Foundations of Instructional Leadership

ED820: Topics in Curriculum and Instruction

ED860: Quantitative Methods Applied to Educational Research

ED801: Group Leadership, Group Processes, and Team Building in Education

ED821: Leadership Assessment and Development

ED861: Qualitative Methods Applied to Educational Research

ED802: Emerging Instructional Technologies

ED822: Talent Development Across the Curriculum

ED865: Introduction to Educational Research Designs

ED803: National Standards Current Practices, and Policies in Education (Summer Institute)

ED823: Models of Creative Thinking

ED881: Dissertation Seminar 1

ED804: Learning, Cognition, and Teaching

ED824: Diversity Issues in Schools

ED882: Dissertation Seminar 2

ED805: Research and Evaluation in Education

ED826: Application of Quantitative and Qualitative Methods Applied to Educational Research

ED883: Dissertation Seminar 3

 

 

ED884: Dissertation Seminar 4

 

 

ED885: Dissertation Seminar 5

18 SH

18 SH

24 SH

3. How do I apply for the Doctor of Education (EdD) in Instructional Leadership?  The application is located online at our website: www.wcsu.edu/EdD-Leadership.

4. What are the admission requirements?  The following information is requested:

  • Application packet: Status information, specific educational background, personal statement regarding professional goals
  • Master’s degree in education or a related field from an accredited institution
  • Evidence of five years of full-time educational experience in a PK-12 setting
  • Résumé
  • Transcripts from all colleges and universities
  • Completion of the Miller’s Analogy Test (MAT) or the Graduate Records Exam (GRE)
  • Three recommendations attesting to the candidate’s capabilities to complete a doctoral program and to make a contribution as an instructional leader
  • Interview with members of the EdD Admissions Committee

5. What is the cost of the program?  Costs are set by the Connecticut State University Board of Regents.  Graduate tuition and fees are located at http://www.wcsu.edu/registration/grad-tuition.asp

6. Are there any prerequisite courses?  Students applying for the EdD in Instructional Leadership must already have completed a Master’s degree in education or a related field.  There are no specific prerequisite courses, however applicants are asked to indicate their experiences related to the topics of curriculum and instruction, educational technology, foundations of education, measurement and evaluation, and special education.

7. What does it mean to be part of a cohort model?  A new cohort is accepted into the program every other year beginning in the fall of 2003.  Approximately 20-25 students are in each cohort.  Students complete courses together in the same sequence.  The model provides the opportunity for candidates to form study groups and to serve as a support system while advancing through the program.

8. How long will it take for me to complete the program?  This program is designed for full-time educators to complete a doctoral degree while taking classes on a part-time basis.  Participants are accepted into the program every other year (Fall 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, etc.) and may complete all requirements over a 57-month period, or just under 5 years as a part-time graduate student.  Students have completed the program in 4 years.  Candidates are expected to complete all course work during three academic years, including two summers.  After completing the comprehensive exams in the summer of the third year, the dissertation process begins in the fall.  An individual may take up to 6 years to complete the program, otherwise an application for an extension is required.  The overall sequence is illustrated below.

Program Sequence

Academic Year 1
(12 SH)
2 courses/ semester

Summer 1
(6 SH)
2 courses

Academic Year 2
(12 SH)
2 courses/ semester

Summer 2
(3 SH)
1 course

Academic
Year 3
(12 SH)
Coursework Completed
Summer Comprehensive Exams

Academic Year 4
(6 SH)
Dissertation Seminars
1 and 2

Summer
4
(3 SH)
Dissertation Seminar 3

Academic Year 5
(6 SH)
Dissertation Seminars
4 and 5

Note. SH = Semester Hours.  Courses are 3 credits each.

9. What is the sequence of courses and experiences?  The timeline for courses is available on our website: www.wcsu.edu/EdD-Leadership.  The program is also designed to provide candidates with a variety of experiences including publishing, program evaluation, professional development activities, and conference presentations.  Every other year, students and faculty members organize an Instructional Leadership Conference to highlight student accomplishments, activities of educators in local school districts, and pertinent research conducted by colleagues in other institutions.

Course Timeline

Date

Program Requirement

Cohort Entry Date- Fall 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2013, 2015, etc.

Fall 1

EdD and Admin. Cert.

ED800: Foundations of Instructional Leadership

EdD

ED821: Leadership Assessment and Development

Spring 1

EdD ED801: Group Leadership, Group Processes, and Team Building in Education

ED822: Talent Development Across the Curriculum

Summer 1

EdD

ED802: Emerging Instructional Technologies
ED803: National Standards Current Practices, and Policies in Education (Summer Institute)

Fall 2

EdD and Admin. Cert.

ED804: Learning, Cognition, and Teaching

EdD

ED860: Quantitative Methods Applied to Educational Research

Spring 2

EdD and Admin. Cert.

ED820: Topics in Curriculum and Instruction

EdD

ED861: Qualitative Methods Applied to Educational Research

Summer 2

EdD

ED824: Diversity Issues in Schools

Fall 3

EdD

ED865: Introduction to Educational Research Designs
ED826: Quantitative and Qualitative Applications of Educational Research
Begin pre-Dissertation Advisement

Spring 3

EdD and Admin. Cert.

ED805: Research and Evaluation in Education

 

EdD

ED823: Models of Creative Thinking
pre-Dissertation Advisement

Summer 3

EdD

Comprehensive Exams

Fall 4

EdD

ED881: Dissertation Seminar 1
Proposal; Chapter 2 started

Spring 4

EdD

ED882: Dissertation Seminar 2
Proposal Review Process;
Proposal Revisions; Set-up and Permission; Data Collection started

Summer 4

EdD

ED883: Dissertation Seminar 3; Chapters 1, 2 and 3 completed;
Data collection

 

Admin. Cert.

EDL618: Understanding the Political and Ethical Environment of School Leadership
EDL656: Leadership and Supervision in Teaching and Learning

Fall 5

EdD

ED884: Dissertation Seminar 4; Data collection completed; Research completed; Chapters 4 and 5 started

 

Admin. Cert.

ED660: Internship & Seminar in Educational Leadership: Theory, Research, & Practice I

Spring 5

EdD

ED885: Dissertation Seminar 5
Chapters 4 and 5 completed; Editing
Dissertation Defense

 

Admin. Cert.

ED665: Internship & Seminar in Educational Leadership: Theory, Research, & Practice II

Summer

EdD

Dissertation Defense

Fall

EdD

Dissertation Defense

Note. Course sequence may be subject to change.

10. What will my schedule look like?

The EdD program includes 60 credits

  • 15 courses (45 credits) over 3 years are followed by a comprehensive exam
  • 5+ courses (approx. 15 credits) to complete the dissertation process through 5 or more semesterly seminars
  • The seminar requirements “chunk” the dissertation process into manageable bits
  • A dissertation committee under the guidance of a primary advisor directs the process

Year 1

  • 2 courses in the fall, on the same night from 5:00-7:00 and 7:15-9:15 (once/week plus 1 Saturday class/course)
  • 2 courses in the spring, on the same night from 5:00-7:00 and 7:15-9:15 (once/week plus 1 Saturday class/course)
  • 2 courses in the summer, 1 during evenings in July, 1 the last week in July from 8:00 AM–4:00 PM

Year 2

  • 2 courses in the fall, on the same night from 5:00-7:00 and 7:15-9:15 (once/week plus 1 Saturday class/course)
  • 2 courses in the spring, on the same night from 5:00-7:00 and 7:15-9:15 (once/week plus 1 Saturday class/course)
  • 1 course in the summer, during July

Year 3

  • 2 courses in the fall, on the same night from 5:00-7:00 and 7:15-9:15 (once/week plus 1 Saturday/course)
  • 2 courses in the spring, on the same night from 5:00-7:00 and 7:15-9:15 (once/week plus 1 Saturday/course)
  • Comprehensive Exams, the last 2 Saturdays in July

Year 4

  • Fall (proposal), Spring (data collection), Summer (chapters 1-3)

Year 5

  • Fall (chapters 4 and 5), Spring+ (revisions/defense)

11. What if it takes me more than 6 years to finish the program? An individual may take up to 6 years to complete the program, otherwise an application for an extension of the 6-year time limit is required.  This extension is subject to approval by the Graduate Council. 

12. When do I complete my dissertation?  The dissertation process begins as soon as you start to think about possible topics for your investigation.  This should commence with your first course.  Collect ideas, discuss them with your peers and professors, and begin to investigate the feasibility of each by reviewing the literature.

You will formally begin the dissertation process after completing your comprehensive exams, which are scheduled in the summer of the third year of study. This program has been designed to assist you to complete your dissertation by having a series of seminars for each stage of the process.  The proposal, proposal defense, data collection process, and chapter revisions are incorporated into the seminars.  The dissertation process culminates in the Dissertation Defense.

13. Do I choose a major advisor or is one assigned to me? Your major advisor will be determined according to the topic you choose and the type of research methodology that is best for your study.  While a major advisor is assigned by the Program Coordinator, changes might be made as a candidate refines ideas based on research content and procedures.

14. How do I select my doctoral advisory committee?  A doctoral committee includes at least three people who have earned doctoral degrees.  They will guide you through your dissertation process.  With guidance from your major advisor and the Program Coordinator, you will select and contact two individuals to serve as secondary advisors on your doctoral committee.  These individuals, in addition to your major advisor, will be your doctoral advisory committee.

15. Is there a residency requirement? This is a part-time program and there is no requirement for full-time commitment to coursework, therefore, there is no residency requirement.

16. Can I transfer in courses?  Yes. Up to 9 hours of prior coursework may be transferred into a program of study.  These courses can be no older than 6 years when the candidate graduates from the present program, each course must be at the doctoral level, and each course must be equivalent to the course it is replacing.  Consult with the Program Coordinator in order to apply to transfer any courses.  Both a course description and syllabus must be reviewed in order to make this determination.  No course can be transferred if it was a requirement for a formerly completed degree.  In the State of Connecticut, Sixth Year Certificate (SYC) programs are considered to be degree programs.

17. May I take courses at other universities?  Certain courses may be taken, but only with prior written permission of the Program Coordinator.  Before registering for any course outside of the EdD in Instructional Leadership program, an approved form must be filed with the graduate office.

18. Are the courses offered every semester?  The courses in this program are offered in a given sequence only.  When a cohort is accepted, it is expected that all students enroll in the set sequence of courses.  While these courses are offered in a presented sequence, a student seeking any change in the sequence must apply for a change through the Program Coordinator.  For example, changes could occur if a student transfers credits from another institution.

19. How do I register for classes? Each semester, registration procedures are handled by the Program Coordinator, who sends the schedule and a list of students/course to the office for the Division of Graduate Studies. 

20. How is the Administrative Certification incorporated into the program? The Certification for Intermediate Administration and Supervision (Endorsement #092) is an optional program for WCSU’s EdD in Instructional Leadership candidates.  Four courses incorporated into the EdD program are a part of the course sequence for the accredited administrative endorsement (ED 800: Foundations of Educational Leadership, ED 804: Learning, Cognition, and Teaching, ED 820: Topics in Curriculum and Instruction, and ED 805: Research and Evaluation in Education).  Students who wish to obtain this certificate, apply to the “092” program and complete an additional 4 courses.  Two of these courses are offered in collaboration with Central Connecticut State University (CCSU) and the other 2 courses constitute the required program internship.  Students may complete the courses for the administrative certificate beginning in Summer 2, Summer 3, or after obtaining the doctoral degree.

A schedule for both programs is indicated in the program timeline (www.wcsu.edu/graduate/edd/edd-timeline.pdf).  This timeline represents a schedule for beginning the additional administrative courses in Summer 3.

21. What else do I need to know? Take some time to read the graduate catalog (www.wcsu.edu/catalogs/graduate/) and the EdD in Instructional Leadership website (www.wcsu.edu/EdD-Leadership ).  The catalog contains the basic academic rules and regulations of the university and provides course descriptions, while the program website contains all documents pertaining to the EdD procedures.

22.  What are key outcomes of the program? Our greatest outcomes are represented by the accomplishments of our students.  Of the 38 candidates who were eligible to defend their dissertations, 34 (89.5%) will have completed their work by August 2011.  The national average for dissertation completion is 50%.  Candidates are indeed becoming active leaders and researchers in their school communities both before and after they graduate.  They influence their local schools and districts by accepting the following roles: Department Chair, School Dean, Principal, Assistant Principal, District Language Arts Coordinator, Mentor Program Director, Grant Director, NEASC Coordinator, Director of Technology, etc.  They have also led their schools to becoming award-winning institutions at the state, regional, and national levels.

In order to prepare for an Accreditation Review in Spring 2008, an external consultant, Dr. Dennis Shirley from Boston College, was asked to review all aspects of the program.  He reviewed all program documents and held individual and group interviews with faculty members, students, community members, and university administrators. Among other comments, Dr. Shirley made the following two points:

As a professor of education who is well aware that one of the persistent criticisms of schools of education for decades has been that they are excessively theoretical and irrelevant to the concerns of teachers, principals, and superintendents, I found myself admiring the commitment, talent, and vision of the faculty and staff at WCSU who created and are sustaining the Instructional Leadership doctoral program.

Second, the collaborative nature of the instructional leadership doctoral program was evident throughout this site visit.  Within WCSU, the program is viewed by students, faculty, and administrators to be internally coherent and well sequenced.  Discussants held that the doctoral program is embedded in a broader, university-wide commitment to the improvement of public education that they find praiseworthy and worthy of emulation by other universities.  Significantly, local educational leaders on the Advisory Board agreed, confirming that the doctoral program is meeting their needs for highly qualified teachers and administrators.

Dr. Shirley’s very positive assessment of the program is reinforced by the following student comments:
The excitement of working with classmates who are experienced practicing educators and faculty members who are dynamic and engaging challenges my thoughts and ideas about education.  Frank LaBanca, Oxford Public Schools

This doctoral program enables me to not only be a stronger, more knowledgeable leader, but it also inspires me to be a better educator.
Joan McGettigan, New Canaan Public Schools

I have learned so much about myself as an educator and a leader through participation in this program. Nora Marrinan, Ridgefield Public Schools

I have no regrets about choosing to participate in this challenging program.
Mike Obre, Danbury Public Schools

I came to WestConn’s Ed.D. Program for the education, but I am staying because of the inspiration. Lori Kolbusz, Norwalk Public Schools


Dissertation Topics of Cohort 1

Doctoral Student

Employer

Title of Dissertation

Anekwe, Pat
Graduated May 2008

Bridgeport, CT

Characteristics and Challenges of High-Achieving Second-Generation Nigerian Youths in the United States

Bennett, Nora Graduated May 2010

Ridgefield, CT

The Relation Between Learning Styles and Student Development of Musical Compositions

Bernstein, Stacy
Graduated May 2008

Lakeland, NY

An Exploratory Study of Instructional Practices for Heritage Language Learners in Traditional Middle School Spanish Classes

Cosentino, Pat
Graduated May 2008

Bethel, CT

The Kindergarten Buddy Program and Its Effect on Reading Achievement for At-Risk Kindergarten Students

Devine, Jessica
Graduated May 2008

Brookfield, CT

A Comparison of Teachers’ Perceptions of the Leadership Styles of Middle School Principals and Instructional Leaders and Their Relationship to Teachers’ Perceptions of School Climate

Goolkasian, Pauline
Graduated May 2008

Bethel, CT

Effects of a Collaborative Teaching Model of Professional Development on New Sixth through Twelfth Grade Teachers' Attitudes, Self-Efficacy, Motivation, and Implementation of Instruction

Hardy, Deb
Graduated May 2008

Somers, NY

Perceptions of School Counselors and School Administrators With Respect to the Roles of School Counselors As They Implement the New York State Comprehensive School Counseling Model

Kobylenski, Steve
Graduated May 2009

Naugatuck, CT

Revelations: A Qualitative Inquiry on Visual Artistic Emergence
Common Triggers, Shared Perceptions and Strategies for Perpetuation

Kolbusz, Lori Graduated May 2008

Norwalk, CT

Contributing Factors Leading to Middle School Suspensions

Kowgios, Nick Graduated May 2008

North Salem, NY

Effects of Conceptual Assessments Using Test Debate and Test Analysis on Critical Thinking Skills and Literary Analysis

LaBanca, Frank
Graduated May 2008

Oxford, CT

Impact of Problem Finding on the Quality of Authentic Open Inquiry Science Research Projects

LaValley, Kathy In Process

Danbury, CT

An Analysis of Students' Use and Understanding of Internet Sites

McGettigan, Joan
Graduated May 2008

New Canaan, CT

The Relationship Between Writing Achievement, Writing Self-efficacy, Writing Apprehension, and Perceived Value of Writing by Gender for Third-Grade Students in a Suburban School District

Mitchell, Jen
Graduated May 2008

Greenwich, CT

The Effects of Literacy Coaching on Teacher Strategy Use and Student Reading Comprehension

Obre, Mike Graduated May 2010

Danbury, CT

Art Attitudes of Secondary Level English and Mathematics Teachers in Schools Deemed Successful or In-Need-of-Improvement Under the No Child Left Behind Act

Salon, Krys
Graduated May 2008

Brookfield, CT

Student Perceptions of the Development of Mathematical Self-Efficacy in the Context of the Instructional Setting and Problem Solving Activities

Shaw, Sue
Graduated May 2008

Middlebury, CT

The Effects of Metacognitive Awareness on the Development of Mathematical Problem-Solving Skills in Fourth-Grade Homework Assignments

Sinatra, Mike
Dissertation Graduated May 2009

Wilton, CT

An Investigation of the Potential Benefits of a Faculty Mentor Program as Related to High School Students’ Attitudes, Affiliation, and Self-Efficacy

Spatola, Annmarie
Graduated May 2008

Carmel, NY

The Effects of a Study Skills Program on Self-Efficacy and Self-Regulated Learning Strategies Use

Velez, Ray
Dissertation Graduated May 2009

Norwalk, CT

The Bard High School Early College Model of Teaching Writing and Its Relation to Higher Order Thinking Skills

Woodel, Billie Defending July 2010

Ridgefield, CT

Creative Thinking and Learning Styles of Secondary School Students Recognized for Their Artistic, Athletic, and Scientific Talents

Zelvis, Rima
Graduated May 2008

Kent, CT

The Effects of Visual Thinking Strategies on Reading Achievement of Students With Varying Levels of Motivation

 

Dissertation Topics of Cohort 2

Doctoral Student

Employer

Title of Dissertation

Barrier-Ferreir, Julia Graduated May 2010

Bethel, CT

The Effect of the LANGUAGE! Literacy Program on the Reading Comprehension and Reading Motivation of Struggling Middle School Readers.

Boller, Barbara Graduated May 2010

Stamford, CT

Effects of Fast ForWord on Phonological Awareness and Rapid Naming Skills of At-risk Readers

Colletti-Houde, Heather In Process

Westport, CT

A Comparison of Characteristics of Instructional Leaders and Educational Leaders

Friedlander, Diana Graduated May 2010

Ridgefield, CT

Comparison of the Learning Styles of Students with Autism Versus Typical Elementary-School Students

Greenwood, Jacob Graduated May 2010

Ridgefield, CT

The Effect of Reflective Portfolio Use on Student Self-Regulation Skills in Science

Henrichs, Ruth In Process

Arlington, NY

An Examination of the Multicultural Sensitivity of Fifth Grade Students

Jenkins, Melissa Graduated August 2011

Norwalk, CT

African American Adolescents' Perceptions of Their Learning, Instructional and Relational Factors

Kor, Raina Graduated May 2010

Irvington, NY

Teachers' and Principals' Perceptions of Leadership Characteristics and The Relationship of These Perceptions to School Climate

Leonard, Timothy J. Graduated May 2010

Somers, NY

The Effects of Reading and Discussing Poetry on Fifth Grade Students’ Motivation to Read and Vocabulary Achievement

Levy, Holli  Graduated May 2011

Ridgefield, CT

An Examination of Attitudes Toward Mathematics By Gender, Grade Level, and Parental Perceptions

Mead, Laura Graduated May 2010

Danbury, CT

The Effects of Using Four Powerful Comprehension Strategies in a Gradual Release Lesson Design and Learning-Style Preferences on Reading Comprehension and Self-Perception of Struggling Readers

Morgatto, Sara Graduated May 2011

Seymour, CT

Factors that Contribute to the Completion of Eligibility in Division III Women's Intercollegiate Sports

Samuelson, Teresa Graduated May 2010

Fairfield, CT

An Examination of an Early Intervention Reading Program Focusing on the Progress Monitoring of Literacy Skills and the Reading Self-Concepts of Struggling Readers

Schullery Corso, Patricia-Ann Graduated May 2010

Sherman, CT

The Effects of an Anti-Cyber Bullying Program on Decreasing the Number of Aggressive Experiences for Students While Using Digital Technology

Zobler, Ana Graduated May 2010

Wilton, CT

Effects of Listening Strategies Instruction on Listening Comprehension, Oral Proficiency, and Metacognition on Second Language Learners

 

Dissertation Topics for Cohort 3

Doctoral Student

Employer

Title of Dissertation

Aldrich, Marguerite Anticipated Graduation 2012-2013

Western Connecticut State University

Daughters of China: An examination of the Home, School, and Community Experiences of Adolescent and Young Adult Chinese Adoptees

Baratta, Donna Graduated May 2012

Yorktown Central School District

The Effects of Online Professional Development in Technology with Virtual Communities of Practice on Teachers' Attitudes and Content Integration

Bell, Stephanie Graduated August 2012

Rockland BOCES in NY

An Exploration of the Effects of Student-Directed and Teacher-Directed Inquiry Learning on Creative Problem- Solving, Critical Thinking, and Civic Responsibility

Cloutier, Andrew Anticipated Graduation 2012-2013

Wilton Public Schools

The Effects of Thematic Social Studies Instruction on Eighth Grade Students’ Historical Reasoning Ability and Attitudes Towards Social Studies Related Tasks

DeBlasio, Gail Graduated May 2012

New Haven Public Schools

An Examination of the Spiritual Intelligence and Social and Emotional Learning Skills of Public School Students in an Urban School District

Ewings, Stacy Graduated May 2012

Guilford Public Schools

The Effects of Parental use of Learning-Styles Strategies on Parent and Student Attitudes Toward Homework Assistance and Student Academic Self-Perception

Feinstein, Margaret Anticipated Graduation 2012-2013

Beacon City School District, NY

Summer Literacy Experiences: Children’s and Parents’ Responses to Multicultural Children’s Literature

Galdo, JoAnne Anticipated Graduation 2012-2013

Ridgefield Public Schools

Literature Response Blogs and Summer Literacy: Exploring Summer Reading Setback and Reading Motivation of 3rd Grade Striving Readers

Guertin, Susan Anticipated Graduation 2012-2013

New Milford Public Schools

Understanding Teacher use of Inquiry: Catalysts and Barriers

Higgins, Patrick Anticipated Graduation 2012-2013

Region 9 Public Schools

The Effects of Using a Critical Thinking Graphic Organizer to Improve Connecticut Academic Performance Test Interdisciplinary Writing Assessment Scores

LeFevre , Jennifer Graduated May 2012

Henrick Hudson School District

An Investigation of How Kindergarten Teachers' Philosophy and Perceptions are Interrelated to the Actual Practice of Play in Their Classrooms

Longo, Christopher Graduated May 2012

Bethel Public Schools

Effects of n Inquiry-Based Science Program on Critical Thinking, Science Process Skills, Creativity, and Science Fair Achievement of Middle School Students

Mallozzi, Floria Anticipated Graduation 2012-2013

Trumbull Public Schools

The Effects of Using Interactive Student Notebooks and Specific Written Feedback on Seventh Grade Students’ Science Process Skills

McKinnon, Jason Graduated May 2012

Ridgefield Public Schools

Effects of Scaffolding Higher Order Thinking Questions on Reader Self-Efficacy and Critical Thinking of Sixth Grade Students 

Mumford, Deborah Graduated May 2012

Edgemont Public Schools

An Examination of the Factors Related to Elementary School Classroom Teachers' Self-Efficacy and the Impact of Self-Efficacy Beliefs on Teaching Outcomes in Science

Priest, John Anticipated Graduation 2012-2013

Wilton Public Schools

The Effects of Cognitive Learning Abilities on Student Attitude, Interpretation, and Integration of Content When Reading Graphic Novels

Ramos, Emily Graduated May 2012

retired from North Rockland Central School District-New York state

Exito: Factors Contributing to Second Grade Latina/o American Students' Successful Acquisition of the Discources of School

Reynolds, Amy Graduated May 2012

North Salem Central School District

Attitudes and Beliefs Held by Teachers on Interdisciplinary Teams with Common Planning Time at a Highly Effective Middle School

Ruggiero, Christopher Anticipated Graduation 2012-2013

Lakeland Central School District

An Investigation of the Role of Empathy in the Leadership Repertoire of Building Administrators

Rumble, Merle Anticipated Graduation 2012-2013

Norwalk Public Schools

I Too Have a Voice:  The Literacy Experiences of Black Boys Engaging with and Responding to African American Literature Depicting Black Males

Sands, Michelle Graduated May 2012

North Salem Central School District

The Impact of a Peer Leadership Program on High School Students' Social Capital, as Measured by Co-Cognitive Factors of the Renzulli Houndstooth Theory

 

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