WCSU News

ESPN news editor Claire Smith featured in film and lecture at WCSU

Black Heritage-History Month program presents talk Feb. 26, film screening March 5

image of Claire Smith

Claire Smith

DANBURY, CONN. — The life and career of veteran sportswriter and ESPN news editor Claire Smith will be the subject of a documentary film screening on Tuesday, March 5, 2019, and the featured speaker at a lecture on Tuesday, Feb. 26, presented at Western Connecticut State University as part of Black Heritage-History Month.

The Department of Writing, Linguistics and Creative Process and the Office of Diversity and Equity at WCSU will host the screening of “A League of Her Own: The Claire Smith Story,” at 6 p.m. on March 5 in Room 127 of White Hall on the university’s Midtown campus, 181 White St. in Danbury. Snow date for the event is March 6. Smith will discuss her long and accomplished career in a talk at 6:30 p.m. on Feb. 26 in Ives Concert Hall in White Hall on the Midtown campus. Snow date for the lecture is Feb. 27. Admission is free and the public is invited to attend both events.

Smith, who has been a news editor at ESPN since 2007, covered Major League Baseball for more than three decades. She became the first female MLB beat writer as a correspondent for the Hartford Courant in the 1980s, and worked for seven years as a national baseball writer and columnist for the New York Times and nine years as an editor and columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer. The Baseball Writers’ Association of America elected Smith as the 2017 recipient of the J.G. Taylor Spink Award for laudable contributions to baseball writing, becoming the first woman and fourth African American to earn this honor. Her award is on permanent display in the “Scribes and Mikemen” exhibit in the Library of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York.

For more information, send an email to stokesk@wcsu.edu or contact the Office of University Relations at (203) 837-8486.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University changes lives by providing all students with a high-quality education that fosters their growth as individuals, scholars, professionals and leaders in a global society. Our vision: To be widely recognized as a premier public university with outstanding teachers and scholars who prepare students to contribute to the world in a meaningful way.

 

 

‘Ubu’ a reimagined, immersive musical at WCSU

image from 'Ubu'

Joseph Calabrese as Ubu and Jillian Callioutte as Ma Ubu

DANBURY, CONN. – The Western Connecticut State University Department of Theatre Arts will present “Ubu – An Absurdist Immersive Gran Guignol Musical” in eight performances from Feb. 26 through March 4, 2019,  in the Studio Theatre of the Visual and Performing Arts Center on the university’s Westside campus, 43 Lake Ave. Extension in Danbury.

Evening performances will be at 8 p.m. on Feb. 26, 27 and 28, and on March 1, 2 and 4. Matinee performances will be at 2 p.m. on March 2 and 3. Tickets may be purchased online at www.eventbrite.com/e/ubu-tickets-53191957577 or by calling (203) 837-8732. Student and senior tickets are available at the box office with a valid ID.

French playwright Alfred Jarry’s “Ubu Roi” was a topic of great discussion when it opened — and closed — on the same date in 1896. As explained in a 2015 Paris Review article by Dan Piepenbring, “‘Ubu Roi’ [was] a play so contentious that its premiere, in December 1896, was also its closing night. It lives in the annals of drama because it offended almost everyone who saw it. In this, it prefigured modernism, surrealism, Dadaism, and the theater of the absurd.”

The WCSU production, reimagined with original music, lyrics and text, is the handiwork of WCSU Professor of Theatre Arts Sal Trapani, who will also direct. The production contains explicit language throughout the show, and may be considered unsuitable for young children.

Trapani said, “We follow the adventures of Ubu and his wife whose gluttony, greed and lust for power drives them to take over the world. Ultimately, the play is about ourselves and our own obsessions, fascinations and delusions.”

Trapani added, “As an immersive and interactive event, it invites the audience in subtle and not so subtle ways to look at themselves through the lens of Ubu. It also demonstrates in an upbeat and entertaining way how easily we can be seduced by magnetic and charming personalities. It’s a timely and unique event not to be missed.”

The cast includes student actors Joseph Calabrese, of Harwinton, as Ubu; Jillian Caillouette, of Meriden, as Ma Ubu; Kelsey Lepesko, of Stratford, as Rosemonde/Bear; Kenneth Galm, of West Hartford, as Boggerlas; Cynthia Rivera, of Bridgeport, as Salt; Carter Smith, of Ledyard, as Batty; and Zachary Federici, of Rocky Hill, as Manure.

The ensemble, playing a cast of thousands, includes Serena Kelly, of Auburn, Massachusetts; Jamie Leo, of Southbury; Cole Urso and Dina DiMarco, of Wethersfield; Camry Young, of West Haven; Amber Levine and Olivia Kirby, of New Milford; Larry Weatherspoon, of Norwalk; George Pinnock, of Queens, New York; Jovani Perez, of Carmel, New York; and Henry Gough, of Ridgefield.

WCSU theatre department faculty involved with the production are Producer Pam McDaniel, Director Sal Trapani, Music Director Howard Kilik, Choreographer Jen Turey, Production Manager and Technical Director Tom Swetz, Scenic Designer Philip Baldwin, Lighting Designer Scott Cally and Costume Designer Robin L. McGee.

Student production roles include: Katie Giradot, of New Milford, Production Stage Manager; Alicia Napolitano, of Woodbury, doing puppets; Dante Cyr, of Waterbury, Dramaturge; and Zane Bendici, of Shelton, Assistant Director.

For more information, contact the Office of University Relations at (203) 837-8486. Get tickets at www.eventbrite.com/e/ubu-tickets-53191957577 or by calling (203) 837-8732.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University changes lives by providing all students with a high-quality education that fosters their growth as individuals, scholars, professionals and leaders in a global society. Our vision: To be widely recognized as a premier public university with outstanding teachers and scholars who prepare students to contribute to the world in a meaningful way.

 

 

WCSU softball to host annual fundraising breakfast

DANBURY, CONN. — The Western Connecticut State University softball team will host its annual fundraising breakfast at 7:15 a.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2019, in the Ballroom of the Campus Center on the university’s Westside campus, 43 Lake Ave. Extension in Danbury. This is the biggest pre-season fundraiser for the team and a great opportunity to meet the players, enjoy a buffet breakfast, and win a silent auction and raffle prizes. The public is invited.

Head Softball Coach Heather Stone said, “As the 2019 softball season approaches, the team looks forward to having another successful season. We have been working hard all year to fundraise for our spring trip. We will be traveling to Florida for our spring training and will play a 12-game schedule. We will also play one J.V. game while in Florida. With a very talented team, it should prove to be a very rewarding trip, as we kick off our season and our journey to the NCAA tournament.”

In case of inclement weather, the make-up date is Wednesday, March 6, at the same time and place.

To sponsor a table or for more information, contact Stone at stoneh@wcsu.edu or call (203)-837-9019.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University changes lives by providing all students with a high-quality education that fosters their growth as individuals, scholars, professionals and leaders in a global society. Our vision: To be widely recognized as a premier public university with outstanding teachers and scholars who prepare students to contribute to the world in a meaningful way.

 

 

WCSU to offer spring semester series on biology research topics

Public lectures to address themes from science advocacy to climate change impact in Arctic

DANBURY, CONN. — The Western Connecticut State University Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences will offer a spring semester series of research seminars beginning Feb. 21, 2019, that will cover diverse topics including science advocacy, the evolution of Arctic lake ecosystems, and neuroscience and human behavior.

All seminars will be at 4 p.m. in Science Building Room 125 on the university’s Midtown campus, 181 White St. in Danbury. Admission will be free and the public is invited; a reception will be held in the Science Building Atrium immediately after each presentation.

In the opening seminar on Thursday, Feb. 21, WCSU Assistant Professor of Biological and Environmental Sciences Dr. Rayda Krell will present “Beyond the Laboratory: How to be a Science Advocate and Why It’s Important.” Other seminars will be Thursday, March 28, “Secrets from an Early Eocene Arctic Lake: Global Warming, Biogeography and Evolutionary Stasis,” presented by Connecticut College Professor of Botany and Environmental Studies Dr. Peter Siver; and Thursday, April 25, a discussion of topics in neuroscience and behavioral research, presented by Wesleyan University Professor of Psychology and of Neuroscience and Behavior Dr. Matthew Kurtz.

image of Rayda Krell

Rayda Krell

Krell is the research study coordinator for the WCSU Tickborne Disease Prevention Laboratory, where she has worked with TDPL Director and Associate Professor of Biological and Environmental Sciences Dr. Neeta Connally on a four-year, $1.6 million project funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to study effective means to reduce exposure to Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases in residential settings. Krell and Connally also are collaborators with the Ridgefield Health Department in the “Spray Safe, Play Safe” program, supported by an Environmental Protection Agency grant, that seeks to provide community education about chemical spraying for tick management.

Krell earned dual B.A. degrees in Biology and Russian at Middlebury College and her M.S. and Ph.D. in Entomology at Iowa State University. A member of the Entomological Society of America, her research interests include arthropod ecology and application of this ecology as a basis for prudent pest management. She has taught the Modes of Scientific Communication course at WCSU and has worked in areas of science policy, editing and public outreach.

image of Dr. Peter Siver

Dr. Peter Siver

Siver has received several National Science Foundation grants to pursue study since 2005 of an Arctic lake estimated to have formed about 48 million years ago during the Eocene Epoch, a period of rising greenhouse gas levels and global warming. Analyses of microscopic algae fossil specimens from the lake have provided the basis to determine the chemical conditions of the ancient lake and the evolution of its ecosystems over time, providing a useful model to understand the effects of a warming climate on Arctic lake ecosystems today.

Recipient of a Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut and a Connecticut College faculty member since 1990, Siver holds the Charles and Sarah P. Becker ’27 Professorship in Botany and Environmental Studies and serves as director of the college’s Environmental Studies Program. His research specializations include the study of the biology and chemistry of lakes and other fresh-water bodies, and the study of algae with specific interest in microorganisms. He is the author of four books, two edited volumes and more than 130 peer-reviewed articles, and is credited with the description of new microorganism species. Professional recognitions include the Darbaker Prize from the Botanical Society of America and the Prescott Award from the Phycological Society of America.

image of Dr. Matthew Kurtz

Dr. Matthew Kurtz

Kurtz is the director of the Schizophrenia Cognition Laboratory at Wesleyan, which investigates issues related to cognition and rehabilitation in schizophrenia and related types of severe mental illness. Recipient of a Ph.D. in Psychology and Neuroscience from Princeton University, he took post-doctoral training in the neuropsychiatric aspects of schizophrenia at the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to joining the Wesleyan faculty, he worked for seven years in the Schizophrenia Rehabilitation Program at the Hartford-based Institute of Living, appointed in 2005 as senior research scientist. He has served since 2001 as an adjunct professor of psychiatry in the Yale School of Medicine, and is a consulting neuropsychologist for Connecticut Valley Hospital and the Greater Bridgeport Mental Health Center.

Kurtz is the author or co-author of more than 50 peer-reviewed articles and eight book chapters. He is a licensed psychologist with a specialty in clinical neuropsychological assessment, and a member of several professional organizations including the American Psychological Association, the Schizophrenia International Research Society and the Society for Research in Psychopathology.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University changes lives by providing all students with a high-quality education that fosters their growth as individuals, scholars, professionals and leaders in a global society. Our vision: To be widely recognized as a premier public university with outstanding teachers and scholars who prepare students to contribute to the world in a meaningful way.

 

WCSU to offer community interpreting classes this summer

DANBURY, CONN. — The Western Connecticut State University Department of World Languages and Literature (WLL) will present the summer 2019 class, “Community Interpreting.” The 40-hour program will be offered during Summer Session II twice a week, on Saturdays, from 9 a.m. to 1:15 p.m., and Wednesdays from 4:30 to 8:45 p.m., each with a 15-minute recess, from July 1 to August 3.

Adjunct Professor of Spanish Miguel Purgatorio, a professional interpreter and translator, will lead the class. While the course is taught in English in order to accommodate a multilingual classroom, it is designed for bilingual individuals. Training sessions ground students in what they need to know to launch a career in medical interpreting, educational interpreting or social services interpreting.

“Community interpreting is one of the fastest-growing professions in the world,” Purgatorio said.

Students will use the most comprehensive textbook and workbook in the field. Content will include ethics and standards of practice, interpreting protocols and skills, professional identity and role of the interpreter, medical terminology and practical interpreting exercise. This course has never before been offered at any higher-education institution in Connecticut.

“I am very thrilled to be able to offer this training at WCSU,” Purgatorio said. “It provides the prerequisite for national medical interpreting certification. This is an interactive, skills-based program, and upon successful completion of the course, students will receive a certificate of completion.”

He anticipates a very diverse group of students to join the course, where bilingual nursing students and medical staff are also welcome to complete the training. Participants must also be at least 18 years of age, hold a diploma for completion of secondary studies or equivalent, demonstrate oral proficiency in their working languages and show literacy in their working languages.

Chairperson and Professor of World Languages and Literature Dr. Galina Bakhtiarova expects good turnout for the program and believes this opportunity will help WCSU students within their major.

“We anticipate students, especially Spanish-speaking, as well as members of the community, as a targeted audience,” she said. “For WCSU students, this class will count toward a minor or major in Spanish and Spanish translation. We are very excited to create this opportunity.”

Purgatorio completed a six-day training program in The Community Interpreter International with Cross-Cultural Communications, LLC last summer. This is the only international training agency in the United States for medical and community interpreting and cultural competence based in Columbia, Maryland. The program licenses trainers across the U.S. and worldwide to deliver a national medical, social services and educational 40- to 100-hour interpreter training curriculum.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University changes lives by providing all students with a high-quality education that fosters their growth as individuals, scholars, professionals and leaders in a global society. Our vision: To be widely recognized as a premier public university with outstanding teachers and scholars who prepare students to contribute to the world in a meaningful way.

 

 

WCSU biologist discovers perfect Valentine’s Day gift

image of Paula and Tom Philbrick in Goias, Brazil

Paula and Tom Philbrick in Goias, Brazil

DANBURY, Conn. — Sorry, guys — no matter what you are planning for Valentine’s Day, it won’t be as good as what Dr. Tom Philbrick did for his wife.

Newtown resident Philbrick is a Connecticut State University professor of Biological and Environmental Sciences at Western Connecticut State University. His specialty is the study of the biology, ecology and taxonomy of aquatic flowering plants, and he spends many summers away from home pulling specimens from South American rivers.

Last year, while exploring a small stream in Amapá, Brazil, just north of the mouth of the Amazon River, Philbrick and a colleague found the plant.

The setting of the discovery wasn’t particularly romantic.

Illustration of R paulana

Illustration of R paulana

“It’s a small river about the size of the Still River” in Danbury, Philbrick said. “It flows under a bridge and next to a small farm. There’s nothing particularly exotic about it. What’s interesting is the plant is really common. It covered outcrops throughout the stream. I’m sure the locals knew about it for decades. They likely didn’t use it for anything and didn’t recognize it as a species new to science.”

Philbrick said he understood immediately that the plant represented a new species.

“There are 20 or so genera of this family in South America and I can recognize all of them. The fruits were clearly those of a species of the genus Rhyncholacis (pronounced rincho-LATH-us) but the leaf didn’t fit at all.”

For most of us, the plant itself won’t inspire love songs.

As described by Philbrick, the plant “is distinguished from all other species in the genus by its simple pinnately lobed leaf, which is fleshy and undulate.”

To his credit, Philbrick says that nothing about the physical description of the plant reminds him of his wife, Paula Philbrick. Still, the new plant species is now named for Paula, also a Ph.D. biologist who teaches at UConn-Waterbury. Officially the little plant, part of a group called Riverweeds, is known as Rhyncholacis paulana,

Philbrick found the plant in 2014. He has been to Brazil on research trips many times and works with a Brazilian biologist based in Rio de Janeiro named Dr. Claudia Bove.

After identifying a previously unrecognized species, a scientist must study it in the lab to accurately describe it, prepare scientific drawings, and write a manuscript for a peer-reviewed scientific journal. The article is often revised several times based on the comments of other scientists, and then a final proof is sent to the author for review.

It was while the low-key Philbrick reviewed those proof pages in his living room that he let Paula know about his special gift.

“I was reading the pages and she walked in the room and I said, ‘Well, look at this.’ I think she was pleased. She smiled and I think I saw tears in her eyes,” Philbrick remembered. “Only another biologist would be so touched by a new species being named for them.”

Philbrick said he has named 10 to 15 new plant species during his career and finally realized he should do something special.

“If it wasn’t for my wife, I wouldn’t be doing this work,” he said. “She’s a marine ecologist and she essentially gave up her research career for our family. She was home for 16 years raising our two kids. Without her encouragement while I was in grad school, I probably wouldn’t have gone on to get my Ph.D.  She continues to be one of my most trusted scientific advisers.”

For more information, or to interview Philbrick, email steinmetzp@wcsu.edu or call the Office of University Relations at (203) 837-8486.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University changes lives by providing all students with a high quality education that fosters their growth as individuals, scholars, professionals, and leaders in a global society. Our vision: To be widely recognized as a premier public university with outstanding teachers and scholars who prepare students to contribute to the world in a meaningful way.

 

 

Marian Anderson celebration at WCSU features Jobson, Thompson

Internationally acclaimed vocalist and pianist to perform at VPAC concert Feb. 23

image of Christine Jobson

Christine Jobson

DANBURY, CONN. — Internationally acclaimed vocalist Christine Jobson and pianist Gregory Thompson will perform at Western Connecticut State University on Saturday, Feb. 23, 2019, in a concert celebration honoring the legendary 20th century singer and longtime Danbury resident Marian Anderson.

The concert, which celebrates the 122nd anniversary of Anderson’s birth on Feb. 27, 1897, will be at 7 p.m. in the Veronica Hagman Concert Hall of the Visual and Performing Arts Center on the university’s Westside campus, 43 Lake Ave. Extension in Danbury. General admission is $10; tickets may be purchased online at www.eventbrite.com/e/marian-anderson-celebration-with-christine-jobson-gregory-thompson-tickets-54411023837 or by calling (203) 837-8732. Tickets at a fee of $5 for WCSU faculty and staff and free for WCSU students with ID are available at the VPAC box office.

image of Gregory Thompson

Gregory Thompson

Jobson has performed operatic roles in productions of “La Boheme,” “Porgy and Bess” and “Signor Deluso” and has appeared as a soprano soloist and concert singer across the United States and in Russia, Spain, Portugal, Austria and Bermuda. She has a particular interest in the preservation and dissemination of vocal music written by African American composers including spirituals, anthems, art song, gospel and hymns. She is pursuing studies for a doctoral degree in Vocal Performance and Pedagogy at the Frost School of Music of the University of Miami, where she has been awarded the Presser Foundation Graduate Music Award to support her development as a young artist.

Recipient of a D.M.A. in Piano Performance from the University of South Carolina, Dr. Thompson has performed as a solo and collaborative artist in the United States, Europe and Asia at venues including Carnegie Hall in New York and the Schloss Leopoldskron palace in Salzburg, Austria. His performances with orchestras and chamber ensembles in concert have featured works by Bach, Grieg, Liszt, Schumann, Beethoven, Mozart and many other composers. He also has performed widely as a recitalist at universities across the United States and internationally. He has been praised by the New York Times for his “intuitive feeling for phrase shapes” and his ability to “make a melodic line sing and inflect it with delicate rubato effects.” He also is a veteran music educator who currently serves as associate professor of music at Winston-Salem State University and has held previous faculty positions at several colleges in North and South Carolina.

WCSU recently announced its intention to name the School of Visual and Performing Arts and the Visual and Performing Arts Center in honor of Marian Anderson. The naming project currently in progress seeks to recognize Anderson’s accomplishments in music and civil rights, as well as the memory of her years of activity in Danbury.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University changes lives by providing all students with a high-quality education that fosters their growth as individuals, scholars, professionals and leaders in a global society. Our vision: To be widely recognized as a premier public university with outstanding teachers and scholars who prepare students to contribute to the world in a meaningful way.

 

 

WCSU announces spring 2019 wellness lectures, workshops

DANBURY, CONN. — The Western Connecticut State University Institute for Holistic Health Studies (IHHS) will present a number of lectures and workshops that focus on physical, mental and spiritual health and wellness in the coming months. The holistic and integrative health programs will be free and open to the public.

Two evening guest lectures will be at 7 p.m. in Room 127 of White Hall on the WCSU Midtown campus, 181 White St. in Danbury.

  • Thursday, Feb. 26: “Integrative Medicine for Better Pain Management” presented by Mitchell Prywes, MD, medical director of The Center for Pain Rehabilitation, an integrative medicine practice in Danbury.
  • Tuesday, March 26: “Ayurveda an Art of Healthy Living” presented by Dr. (Vaidya) Jaya Daptardar, Ayurvedic physician, CEO and founder of Active Ayurveda and Yoga LLC. Daptardar concentrates on prevention and wellness, women’s health, nutrition, weight and lifestyle management, and the healing of arthritis, asthma, allergies, acne, digestion issues, chronic pain, mental health, stress-related illness, addiction and Ayurvedic therapies like Shirodhara, Nasya and more.

Additional IHHS events include the following Wellness Wednesday Workshops, which are free and open to the public at 12:30 p.m. on Wednesdays in Room 127 of White Hall on the WCSU Midtown campus:

  • Wednesday, Feb. 6: “Thoughts Shape Our Words and Actions,” presented by Cicely Greaves, owner and operator of REGARD. Greaves practices daily meditation and is a Reiki Master.
  • Wednesday, Feb. 27: “Healthy Habits, Healthy Eating” with Stravros Mastrogiannis, personal trainer and health coach, and owner of Live Your Way Thin in Danbury.
  • Wednesday, March 27: “Environmental Health Where You Call Home” presented by WCSU alumna, Holistic Lifestyle and Ecotherapy Coach Marcia Kendall. She is the host of “Sunday Soulstice” at 11 a.m. on WXCI, the campus radio station.

The ongoing Mudra meditation series will continue at 7 p.m. on the second Tuesday of the month in Room 103 of Warner Hall on the WCSU Midtown campus. The 2019 dates for this series are: Feb. 12, March 12, April 9, May 14, June 11, July 9, Aug. 13, Sept. 10, Oct. 8, Nov. 12 and Dec. 10. 

The Fourth Annual Health, Fitness and Wellness Fair at WCSU will be from noon to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, April 2, 2019, in the Bill Williams Gym in Berkshire Hall on the WCSU Midtown campus. A popular annual event, the fair features local holistic practitioners and health-related organizations demonstrating their areas of expertise, often with free samples.

IHHS Director Christel Autuori planned the spring semester slate of events.

Autuori said, “The holistic and integrative approach to health and wellness is multifaceted and multidimensional. The word holistic relates to the whole person — body, mind and spirit — and encompasses many aspects and factors relating to health. The integrative approach blends the best of our conventional Western medical practices with the best of the non-Western (the alternative or complementary) healing modalities. The holistic and integrative approach to health, therefore, addresses the whole person and utilizes and delivers the best of Western medicine combined with the best of the non-Western modalities and practices: the best of both worlds intertwined in unified treatment plan.”

The IHHS is housed within the Department of Health Promotion and Exercise Sciences (HPX) at WCSU. It encourages the community to explore different aspects of holistic and integrative health through programming and instruction while promoting conventional healing and various traditional, modern and alternative practices.

For more information, contact Autuori at autuoric@wcsu.edu or the Office of University Relations at (203) 837-8486.

 

Western Connecticut State University changes lives by providing all students with a high-quality education that fosters their growth as individuals, scholars, professionals and leaders in a global society. Our vision: To be widely recognized as a premier public university with outstanding teachers and scholars who prepare students to contribute to the world in a meaningful way.

 

Historian Dann Broyld to discuss fight for black liberation then and now

CCSU scholar to relate legacy of key 19th century abolitionists to contemporary struggle

image of Central Connecticut State University historian Dr. Dann Broyld

Central Connecticut State University historian Dr. Dann Broyld

DANBURY, CONN. — Central Connecticut State University historian Dr. Dann Broyld will discuss the work of leading 19th century abolitionists in achieving freedom from slavery in the United States and the impact of their legacy on the contemporary struggle for black liberation in a lecture at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019, at Western Connecticut State University.

Broyld’s talk titled “Douglass, Tubman and Brown: Recasting Their Fight for Black Liberation in the American-Canadian Transnational Light,” sponsored by the Department of History and Non-Western Cultures and the Office of Diversity and Equity, will be presented as part of Black Heritage-History Month at WCSU. The lecture will be in Room 127 of White Hall on the university’s Midtown campus, 181 White St. in Danbury. Admission will be free and the public is invited.

Broyld, who has served since 2014 as assistant professor of Public History and African American History at CCSU, will explore the contributions of Frederick Douglass, Harriet Tubman and John Brown to the eventual abolition of slavery and emancipation of slaves in the United States. He also will place Douglass, Tubman and Brown within the broader context of the continued movement to achieve black liberation.

Broyld earned his Ph.D. in 19th Century U.S. and Afirican Diaspora History at Howard University in 2011, completing his dissertation titled “Borderland Blacks: Rochester, New York, and St. Catharines, Ontario, 1850-1860.” He has served as a consulting scholar for the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Monument and as a member of the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site Board of Trustees. His scholarly work focuses on issues of black identity, migration and transnational relations as well as oral history and museum-community interaction. He previously taught at the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown and is working on a manuscript with the University of Toronto Press.

Broyld’s talk is the first of several Black Heritage-History events planned this month at WCSU. Additional events can be found at www.wcsu.edu/intercultural/spring-2019-events-calendar/february/.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University changes lives by providing all students with a high-quality education that fosters their growth as individuals, scholars, professionals and leaders in a global society. Our vision: To be widely recognized as a premier public university with outstanding teachers and scholars who prepare students to contribute to the world in a meaningful way.

 

 

‘Sip and Sketch’ evening at WCSU pairs art with wine and refreshments

Guests of all artistic levels invited to participate in Jan. 18 event

DANBURY, CONN. — An entertaining and creative evening that pairs the experience of drawing from a live model with wine and refreshments will be offered in the “Sip and Sketch” series event to be held from 7 to 9 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 18, 2019, at Western Connecticut State University.

Guests of all artistic skill levels are invited to create original drawings as they enjoy wine and assorted snacks during the “Sip and Sketch” evening in the Drawing Studio, Room 241 of the WCSU Visual and Performing Arts Center on the university’s Westside campus, 43 Lake Ave. Extension in Danbury. The admission fee includes refreshments as well as basic art supplies including charcoal and paper. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own drawing supplies.

The ticket fee is $25 for general admission, or $20 for WCSU alumni who may obtain the discount code by email correspondence to robeaul@wcsu.edu. Admission to the event is open to adults 21 years of age and older. Tickets may be purchased at the VPAC ticket office or online at www.wcsuvpac.eventbrite.com. The “Sip and Sketch” series is sponsored by the Department of Art and the WCSU Alumni Association.

For more information, contact the Department of Art at (203) 837-8403 or the Office of University Relations at (203) 837-8486.

 

 

Western Connecticut State University changes lives by providing all students with a high-quality education that fosters their growth as individuals, scholars, professionals and leaders in a global society. Our vision: To be widely recognized as a premier public university with outstanding teachers and scholars who prepare students to contribute to the world in a meaningful way.