Updates

Please refer to the Undergraduate catalog PDF

School of Arts & Sciences Department Contact Changes

Biological & Environmental Sciences (Pages 100 and 104)
Patrice Boily, Chair
boily@@wcsu.edu
Science Building 243, Midtown campus
(203) 837-8569

History & Non-Western Cultures
(Pages 101 and 127)
Wynn Gadkar-Wilcox, Chair
wilcoxw@wcsu.edu
Warner Hall 218, Midtown campus
(203) 837-8565

Psychology
(Pages 101 and 143)
Shane Murphy, Chair
murphys@wcsu.edu
Warner Hall 311, Midtown campus
(203) 837-9398

World Languages & Literatures (Pages 101 and 158)
Stacey Alba D. Skar, Chair
skars@wcsu.edu
Berkshire Hall 215A, Midtown campus
(203) 837-8485

School of Professional Studies Department Contact Changes

Education & Education Psychology (Pages 245, 247, 252)
Catherine O’Callaghan, Chair
ocallaghanc@wcsu.edu
Westside Classroom Building 250, Westside campus
(203) 837-3267

Academic Services and Procedures

Withdrawal or Leave of Absence from Western (Page 45)

Full-time and part-time matriculated students who may find it necessary to withdraw from the university should follow the formal withdrawal procedure by completing a Withdrawal form with the Registrar’s Office. Students have two options: they may withdraw from the University, or they may apply for a Leave of Absence if they plan to withdraw for a period of no more than one year (i.e., two academic semesters).

A student who wants to withdraw from the University should consult with a representative in the Registrar’s Office to discuss the withdrawal. Students who are withdrawing are advised that:

  • Students status is changed to non-matriculated. If the student decides to return they must reapply through the Admission’s Office.
  • Withdrawing from the University does not absolve the student from outstanding financial obligations.
  • Students should review the refund policy to determine if they are within the refund guidelines.
  • Students who receive financial aid funds must consult with the Office of Student Financial Services prior to withdrawing from the university regarding any required return or repayment of grant or loan assistance received for that academic term or payment period.
  • If a recipient of student financial aid withdraws from the institution during an academic term or a payment period, the amount of grant or loan assistance may be subject to return and/or repayment provisions.
  • Students readmitted to the University after withdrawal are held to the academic requirements in effect in the catalog at the time of their readmission.
  • For students who withdraw from the University before the last scheduled class, a grade of “W” will be assigned for all courses taken that semester.
  • Students who do not officially withdraw but cease to attend classes are considered enrolled and are likely to receive failing grades.
  • Students who plan to complete the semester but do not intend to return the following semester should complete their withdrawal forms prior to their last final examination dated effective after the end of the semester.
  • Failure to withdraw officially may result in failing grades being recorded on the academic transcript. It may also lead to problems with debt to the University and affect future financial aid awards. Students will be administratively withdrawn.

A Leave of Absence is designed for students who plan to withdraw for a period of no more than one year (i.e., two academic semesters). Students interested in applying for a Leave of Absence should complete the forms with a representative from the Registrar’s office. Students who are applying for a Leave of Absence are advised that:

  • Students will be allowed to maintain their matriculated status.
  • Students will be allowed to maintain their catalog requirements for graduation.
  • Applying for a Leave of Absence does not absolve you from any outstanding financial obligations to the University.
  • Students should review the refund policy to determine if they are within the refund deadlines.
  • Students who receive financial aid funds must consult with the Office of Student Financial Services prior to applying for the leave of absence regarding any required return or repayment of grant or loan assistance received for that academic term or payment period.
  • If a recipient of student financial aid withdraws from the institution during an academic term or a payment period, the amount of grant or loan assistance may be subject to return and/or repayment provisions.
  • For students who apply for a leave of absence before the last scheduled class, a grade of “W” will be assigned for all courses taken that semester.
  • Students who plan to complete the semester but do not intend to register the following semester should complete their leave of absence forms prior to their last final examination dated effective after the end of the semester.

Withdrawal forms and leave absence forms are available in the Registrar’s Office.

Failure to Register
Matriculated students who do not enroll in fall or spring and who do not receive a formal Leave of Absence will be withdrawn for failure to register and must reapply through the Admission’s Office.

Academic Suspension – Pages 47 and 48

A student suspended for academic reasons is no longer a degree candidate. A suspended student may, however, enroll in up to nine credits per semester in classes as a non-matriculant. Students may reapply for admission when their cumulative grade point average reaches the minimum university, department or school admission criterion. Eligibility for readmission does not automatically lead to readmission to Western but only to consideration for readmission by the director of University Admissions.

Credits earned at other institutions are not used to raise a student’s cumulative grade point average. Students who, for academic reasons, are suspended a second time will be dismissed and are not eligible for readmission except under the Fresh Start Policy.

Matriculation (Page 53)
Matriculated Student (Degree Seeking) – Someone who has been formally accepted by Western Connecticut State University to pursue a degree. Matriculated students may attend full-time or part-time.

Non-matriculated Student (Non-Degree Seeking) – Someone who has not been accepted by Western Connecticut State University to pursue a degree. Students may register for no more than eleven credits a semester.

Graduation

Graduation Honors (Page 61)

To be eligible for graduation honors, you must earn a minimum of 45 semester hours of quality point-bearing credit at Western. No pass/fail credits or transfer credits are included in this minimum. Graduation honors standards are based on your cumulative grade point average and are awarded as follows:

Summa Cum Laude- 3.9 to 4.0
Magna Cum Laude – 3.7 to 3.89
Cum Laude – 3.5 to 3.69

December graduates are identified after that term and May candidates are considered at the conclusion of the January intersession semester preceding graduation. Students who have earned a minimum of 45 credits toward their graduation requirements in residence at Western Connecticut State University with a cumulative earned GPA of at least 3.5 are considered to be Graduation Honors candidates eligible for recognition at the May Commencement. Candidacy for May Graduation Honors does not guarantee the award of Graduation Honors upon completion of degree requirements.

Graduation honors, which appear on the transcript and on an honors certificate, will be awarded only to students who complete their graduation requirements with a minimum of 45 credits in residence at Western Connecticut State University and who have a cumulative earned grade point average of at least 3.5. The residency requirement for honors may not be waived. Students with questions regarding academic honors should consult the Academic Dean of their major.

Ancell School of Business Faculty Updates
Management Department
(Page 75)

Stanley Bazan, Chair
bazans@wcsu.edu
Westside Classroom Building 202, Westside Campus
(203) 837-9238
(203) 837- 8527 (fax)

Lorraine DiLeo, Department Secretary
dileol@wcsu.edu
Westside Classroom Building 353, Westside Campus
(203) 837-8341
(203) 837-8527 (fax)

Faculty
P. Assenza
S. Bazan, Chair
E. Buccini
M. Chuang
J. Dai
M. Dugal
L. Forbes
F. Tesch

Adjunct Faculty
R. Butterly
M. Case
A. Ciarleglio
R. Giacolone
A. Gowen
D. Knibbe
M. Monson
P. O’Connor
A. Palmer
J. Santiago
C. Sefton
D. Stevens
R. Watson

School of Visual & Performing Arts Faculty Updates
Art
(Page 291)

Faculty
T. Wells, Chair, Graphic Design
D. Cardonsky, MFA Coordinator, Curatorship, Gallery Studies
M. Portnow, Painting
D. Skora, Graphic Design
J. Tom, Illustration
C. Vanaria, Photography

Adjunct Faculty
R. Alberetti, Painting
V. Baldasanno, Painting
D. Boyajian, Sculpture
R. Brewster, Painting, Printmaking
S. Bruno, Painting
J. Decker, Drawing
B. Dunbar, Photography
M. Grimes, Painting
C. Hartman, Painting
J. Jones, Sculpture
J. Lanzrein, Ceramics
T. Laslo, Graphic Design
J. Leneker, Graphic Design
E. Little, Painting, Art History
J. Mueller, Art History
S. Marques, Painting
P. Nixon, Painting, Art History
F. Patnaude, Sculpture
K. Scaglia, Graphic Design
M. Serao, Painting
E. Shapiro, Photography

Music and Music Education
(Page 295)

Faculty
J. Begian, Chair, Coordinator of Jazz Studies
K. Isaacs, Assoc. Chair, Graduate Coordinator, Theory and Composition, Choral Ensembles
M. Astrup, Voice, Opera Ensemble
M. Callaghan, Horn, Music History, Music Theory
T. Cuffari, Keyboard Competency, Musicianship, Musical Theatre (Special Appointment 2013-2014)
J. Greene, Assistant Coordinator of Jazz Studies, Applied Jazz Saxophone, Jazz Improvisation, Jazz Combos, Jazz Ensemble
C. Ganschow, Coordinator of Music Education, Choral Ensembles
R. Hirshfield, Piano, Music Theory
F. Jiménez, Trombone, Conducting, Orchestra, Wind Ensemble, New Music Ensemble
D. O’Grady, Coordinator of Music Industry Studies, Music Theory, Music Technology, Musicianship, Music Industry
D. Smith, Percussion, Chamber Music
K. Walker, Flute, Chamber Music, Music History, Music Education
T. Wiggins, Symphonic Band, Music Education

Adjunct Faculty
A. Beals, Frankensax, Jazz Studies, Music History & Appreciation
C. Chase, Applied Voice
R. Clymer, Applied Trumpet
C. Cullen, Applied Clarinet, Chamber Music
G. Cuffari, Applied Bassoon, Chamber Music
C. DeAngelis, Applied Jazz Bass
M. Giampietro, World Music in the Classroom
A. Gordon, Opera Ensemble
K. Huffman, Applied Voice
A. Lafreniere, Applied Classical Guitar
H. Levinson, Viola, Chamber Music
D. Lifton, Applied Voice
L. Metcalf, Evolution of Jazz/Rock Music, Jazz Studies
R. Mazzacane, Applied Voice
C. Morrison, Applied Jazz Guitar, Jazz Studies
D. Noland, Applied Saxophone, Chamber Music
J. Oviedo, Applied Saxophone, Chamber Music
V. Paterson, Applied Violin, Chamber Music
K. Peterson, Applied Organ*
M. Roberts, Applied Cello, Chamber Music
J. Robinson, Applied Voice
D. Ruffels, Applied Bass, Jazz Studies
D. Scott, Applied Jazz Trumpet, Jazz Studies
J. Siegel, Applied Jazz Percussion, Jazz Studies
M. Snyder, Applied Oboe, Chamber Music
P. Tomlinson, Applied Jazz Piano, Jazz Studies
R. Weidlich, Applied Voice
D. Weisz, Applied Jazz Trombone, Jazz Studies
K. Wessel, Applied Jazz Guitar, Jazz Studies
D. Westervelt, World Music
G. Winters, Music Technology
*Note: Western is no longer accepting Applied Organ students.

Theatre Arts
(Page 315)

Faculty
P. McDaniel, Chair, Acting, Directing
F. Herbert, Technical Direction, Lighting, Children’s Theatre, Play Production
J. Matos, Coordinator of Musical Theatre, Voice & Movement, Directing, Transition Workshop
E. Popiel, Costume Design, Set Design, Scenic Art, Puppetry, Theatre Design Fundamentals
S. Trapani, Acting, Directing, Children’s Theatre, Production and Performance, Theatre History

Adjunct Faculty
S. Cally, Lighting Design
M. Chii, Set Design
A. DePoto, Acting
S. Harris, Director
J. Johns-Lerner, Costume Technology
A. Jones, Director, Choreographer
L. Jordan, Costume Design
H. Kilik, Musical Direction
D. Lifton, Applied Voice
C. Machokas, Sound Design
J. Mason, Acting, Introduction to the Theatre
R. Mazzacane, Applied Voice
J. Robinson, Applied Voice
E. Parkinson, Musical Theatre-Dance, Choreographer
K. Sneshkoff, Costume Design
K. Sosbe, Asst. Technical Director
A. Stanley Leonard, Theatre Arts Management

Fall 2012 Curriculum Changes

New Course

MIS 307 Social Media in Business 3SH
This course presents concepts and principles related to business models supported by the use of social media. Through a combination of readings, discussions, presentations and writings, we will examine the use of social media in business, its current capabilities, and future directions.

HPX Course Changes – Prerequisites
(pages 280 and 281)

HPX 100 Health Promotion and Maintenance 3SH
From no prerequisite to HPX majors only.

HPX 160 First Aid & Safety 2SH
From no prerequisite to HPX majors only.

HPX 230 Drug Studies 3 SH
From no prerequisite to HPX majors only.

HPX 355 Human Sexuality 3SH
From no prerequisite to HPX majors only.

Philosophy Course Changes (pages 220 and 221)

PHI 100 Problems of Philosophy to PHI 100 Introduction to Philosophy 3SH

PHI 101 Introduction to Ethical Theory to PHI 120 Introduction to Ethical Theory 3SH

PHI 102 Introduction to Logic to PHI 211 Symbolic Logic 3SH

Spring 2013 Curriculum Changes

New Courses

COM 247 Live News & Election Coverage 4SH
This course is a challenging, comprehensive, hands-on news production class. We prepare and create original pre-recorded, edited news packages and live news content. Production includes working in the field, on location, and in a TV studio. Strict adherence to broadcasting deadlines must be met, attendance is mandatory, team work is necessary, and individual responsibility is a must. Lectures provide concepts and theories that inform students about news production work practices and techniques, interviewing, and necessary information regarding civics, government, and politics. Production work 2-4 hours/week beyond class is expected. May be used by Media Arts Production students as a major elective; students may repeat course as a free elective. Prerequisite: COM 146 or instructor permission.

COM 340 Sound for Video 3SH
Sound for Video is a continuation of sound and audio production knowledge and skills learned in COM 146 Basic Video Production. Students will work with aesthetic, design, planning, creative, and technical aspects of audio production specifically for digital film and video. The course features lectures, critical analysis, and relevant hands-on experience through sound recording and editing. Course requires work 2-4 hours/week beyond class time. Prerequisite: COM 146.

HIS 205 War in Cinema 3SH
This course considers the intellectual history of the United States from the settlement of Jamestown in 1607 to the present. Topics covered include theological, scientific, economic, political, gender, and cultural thought.

HIS 415 American Intennectual History 3SH
This course considers the intellectual history of the United States from the settlement of Jamestown in 1607 to the present. Topics covered include theological, scientific, economic, political, gender, and cultural thought. Prerequisite: HIS 148.

Marketing Course Changes
(Page 96)

MKT 301 Principles of Marketing 3SH (course description change)
Marketing is a critical function in for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. Marketing is also a set of processes for creating, communicating and delivering goods, services, experiences and ideas that provide value to customers and managing relationships with these customers in ways that benefit the organization and its stakeholders. This course provides students with an understanding of Marketing processes and their role and impact within the individual organization, society and the global economy. This course introduces students to specific Marketing functions such as Marketing research, advertising, public relations, personal selling, product development, use of social media tools, distribution and pricing.

MKT 310 Consumer Behavior: Concepts, Research Methods and Application 4SH (course description change)
This course takes an empirical approach to the study of Consumer Behavior. Concepts and research methods from marketing and the social and behavioral sciences are applied to describing and understanding consumer decision processes in the context of the global marketplace and relevant technology. Students will examine how marketers use consumer data to make decisions about product development, service, promotion, pricing and distribution channels. This course provides students with an opportunity to explore and apply concepts from the perspectives of the marketer, the consumer and society in general. Prerequisite: Junior Standing (60 credits minimum), MKT 301 and FIN 230 (or another basic statistics course) and GPA ≥ 2.3.

MKT 315 Integrated Marketing Communications: Advertising and Social Media Marketing 4SH (title, credit hour and course description changes)
The advertising portion of the course focuses mass advertising, but also includes sales promotion, public relations, event marketing, and interactive communications on the Internet. The social network marketing portion covers communication with target audiences via the utilization of various social media networks. We examine the analysis and integration of marketing communications elements in campaign and media planning. The course contains a significant quantitative/accountability component.

MKT 333 Sales Management 3SH (course description change)
This course examines the selling process from a managerial perspective. The course stresses the importance of knowing the company and its products as well as the selling environment and customer in both domestic and international contexts. Additionally, the issues involved in managing a sales force are addressed. These include sales planning, forecasting, recruitment, selection, training and compensation of sales people and integration with other elements of the marketing mix. The course has therefore been designed to not only teach core concepts and skills; but also lead students to encounter and reflect upon the critical issues facing today’s sales managers.

MKT 415 Marketing Research: Methods and Application 4SH (course description and prerequisite changes)
The main goal of the marketing research course is to equip students with the key concepts and tools of marketing research and to help students to understand how marketing research assists managerial decision-making and to solve real-life business problems. The marketing research course is designed to provide students with an overview of marketing research in terms of needs, definition, process including using qualitative and quantitative data collection methods, analysis, and reporting. New technologies, global trends and ethical issues in marketing research are also examined. Prerequisite: Senior Standing (90 credits); MKT 301, MKT 310, FIN 230 (or another basic statistics course); GPA 2.3 or higher.

MKT 422 Global Marketing 3SH (course description change)
The aim of this course is to equip students with the tools, tenets, and concepts to explore global opportunities and to improve their abilities to assess and solve global market challenges. The focus will be placed upon the global marketing manager’s role in the development and implementation of marketing plans for a variety of markets with diverse cultural, social, economic, and political/legal systems; along with an emphasis on technological and ethical aspects of global marketing. Students will gain a global perspective of marketing various goods and services in both the consumer and business-to-business markets. Using a marketing planning model, students will examine global marketing situations, objectives, strategies and marketing programs for business organizations.

Philosophy Course Changes
(Pages 220 and 221)

PHI 231 Ancient Philosophy 3SH (Formerly PHI 210)
A study of the founding figures in the history of Western philosophy from the pre-Socratics through the major writings of Plato and Aristotle. No prerequisite.

PHI 233 Modern Philosophy 3SH (Formerly PHI 212)
A study of the major trends in philosophy from the humanism and new science of the Renaissance through Kant. The course includes continental rationalists, the British empiricists and Kant’s attempt to synthesize them. No prerequisite.

PHI 240 Philosophy of Religion 3SH (Formerly PHI 202)
An examination from various philosophical points of view of some of the main topics in the philosophy of religion. These topics include: the concept of God, grounds for belief in God, faith and reason, the problem of evil, religion and morality, religious experience and religious language. No prerequisite.

PHI 262 Philosophies of Love and Friendship 3SH (Formerly PHI 220)
A critical study of philosophical theories of the nature of love with readings from classical to contemporary authors representing a variety of philosophical schools and points of view. No Prerequisite.

PHI 316 Philosophy of Science 3SH (Formerly PHI 222)
The course will begin with an examination of the evolution of scientific theories. This history illuminates science as a social institution as well as the components of scientific theories and the “logic” of theory formation. Students will be encouraged to pursue independent readings and to develop seminar presentations. Prerequisite: Any PHI course or instructor permission.

PHI 320 Social and Political Philosophy 3SH (Formerly PHI 200)
The course is concerned with such questions as the nature and source of law, property, origin and limitation of sovereign authority, and the rights and duties of citizens. Prerequisite: Any PHI course or instructor permission.

PHI 332 American Philosophy 3SH (Formerly PHI 216)
An examination of the chief contributions in American philosophic thought as reflected in the works of authors such as Edwards, Emerson, Royce, Pierce, James, Dewey and Santayana. Major focus is upon developments in Pragmatism. Prerequisite: Any PHI course or instructor permission.

PHI 334 Existentialism 3SH (Formerly PHI 214)
An examination of the works of major existentialist thinkers. Special topics taken from existentialist writings include: being, time, freedom, consciousness, existential psychoanalysis, and faith. Prerequisite: Any PHI course or instructor permission.

PHI 340 Non-Western Philosophy 3SH (Formerly PHI 218)
A study of the development of ethics, political philosophy, aesthetics, and metaphysics in Indian, Chinese, Japanese, and Persian writings. Prerequisite: Any PHI course or instructor permission.

Social Work Course Changes
(Page 286)

SW 245 Child Welfare: Theory and Practice 3SH (title, prerequisite and course description changes)
This course is designed to provide a practice model which is family focused and child centered for helping families at risk. The course examines the complex interplay of policy and law as they affect practice and service delivery. The course is grounded in ecological approaches, cultural competency, principles of family continuity, and the historic values of the social work profession. This course is an elective course for social work majors who have successfully completed SW 200 and SW 210 or the have the permission of the course instructor. Prerequisite: SW 200 and 210.

SW 306 Social Work Junior Field Practicum & Seminar 3SH (title, credit hour and course description changes)
This is the first field experience in a social service agency. The field practicum is for 8 hours per week over a period of 13 weeks, with a required one hour weekly seminar. This seminar is designed to provide students with an opportunity to conceptualize and evaluate their developing competencies, participate in collaborative peer learning, and integrate the field experience with the theoretical and conceptual frameworks of generalist social work practice. Requirements: acceptance to Junior Standing in the major. Co-requisites: SW 306 and SW 309. This course requires registration permission of the Department of Social Work Chair. Spring Semester.and acceptance to Junior Standing in the major.

Theatre Arts Course Changes
Pages 331 and 332

THR 125 Design Fundamentals for Theatre 3SH (title and course description changes)
is course introduces the student of Theatrical Design and Technology, to the important fundamentals of hand drawing and design for ALL future design applications. Included in this class will be exploration of the principles of hand drawing, color theory, visual research, sensorial expression and all basic design elements as they apply to theatre scenography. It is the first in the series for theatrical design candidates. This class is open to non-majors, space permitting.

THR 150 – Performance Techniques: Integration of Voice and Movement 3SH (course description change)
nd practice of the physical and vocal instruments based on the Linklater Method. This class is designed to remove hidden blocks that inhibit the human instrument, recondition the mind and body of the actor, and support the development of a vocal technique for effective communication both on stage and in our daily lives.

THR 180 Introduction to Theatre Arts 3SH (course description change)
Designed for non-majors, an exploration of the way theatre both shapes and reflects society, with a critical examination of the various arts and skills involved. Study will include the various artists and technicians participating in the collaborative process of making theatre. Emphasis is on the creative function of the contemporary audience and how individuals of diverse eras and cultures have related to theatrical performance.

THR 181 Acting I: Character Study 3SH (title and course description changes)
The foundations for playing a character will be explored through theatre games, improvisation and scene study. The course will explore the Stanislavski Method for actors. Emphasis will be on script analysis, performance and discussion within a studio setting. Students are required to participate in all course-related activities.

THR 182 Technical Theatre I 3SH (course description change)
This is the introduction to stagecraft, lighting and sound. Using both lecture and practical application students will learn the vocabulary and skill to support technical production for the theatre. A minimum of 30 hours of supervised production work outside of the class is a requirement.

THR 201 Playmaking with Children 3SH (title and course description changes)
A study of the various techniques and skills associated with the practice of creative drama introduced through three main approaches: activity-based work, literature-based work/story drama, and situation-based work/process drama. Through the use of informal dramatic forms incorporating art, music, stories, games, poetry and improvisation, students will develop a practical understanding of the various skills and techniques needed to use creative drama strategies as an art form and as a teaching tool in a variety of contexts.

THR 252 Acting for the Camera 3SH (course description change)
An introduction to the principles and techniques of acting on camera, this course explores different techniques for work with three cameras, commercials, acting for film and acting for television. Focus is given to techniques for various camera types of auditions.

THR 260 Voice and Diction 3SH (course description and prerequisite changes)
Extending the skills, exercises, and techniques introduced in THR 150, Performance Techniques, this course guides the student through advanced work for healthy vocal communication. It begins with a review of what is considered optimal posture and alignment, breath (including support), vibration, resonance, and articulation. The course work aims to provide a series of exercises to free, develop and strengthen the voice as a human instrument in context of human communication and as a performer’s instrument. The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is used as a practical tool for hearing and notating the sounds used in language. Prerequisite: THR 150.

THR 281 Acting II: Scene Study 3SH (title and course description changes)
Theory and practice in advanced techniques of character development inside the context of a scene. Study includes analysis of scene structures, styles and role study. Lecture, discussion, improvisational exploration and laboratory performance.

THR 283 Scenic Design 3SH (title and course description changes)
A study of the standards, techniques and skills involved in designing scenery for stage and an application of these principles through design and development of stage design projects: drafting, sketching, visual research and rendering, will be undertaken. Students will engage in practical experience on current productions, lecture, discussion and laboratory.

THR 284 Costume Technology for Theatre 3SH (title and course description changes)
Through this course, students will gain an understanding of how costumes are constructed for theatre. By way of completed costume construction projects, students will learn: basic hand and machine sewing skills, beginner draping, and construction techniques such as pattern drafting, etc. This class will also touch upon costume craft techniques of millinery, dying and novelty application.

THR 300 Theatre Production Lab 1-3SH (course description change)
Designed for majors with participation by non-majors by special permission. Active participation in theatre activities. Theatre Majors must earn one credit every semester, portfolio semester optional. Activity requires a minimum of sixty (60) hours of supervised, laboratory work. This course may be repeated for credit, but not more than three semester hours may be earned in one semester. First and second-year theatre arts students will rotate in scenery, lighting, costume, sound, musical accompaniment, management, company management, marketing and performance.

THR 384 Fundamentals of Stage Lighting 3SH (title and course description changes)
This course is an introduction to the theories and methods of stage lighting. The focus is on the use of technology and the design process.

THR 384 Directing I 3SH (course description change)
Basic methods and techniques of directing plays, with special emphasis on working with actors, casting, rehearsal methods, dramatic action, tempo/rhythm and climactic structure. Course will include lecture, discussion and laboratory experience. Students will direct a 10-minute play presented in an evening of one-acts.

THR 387 Devised Theatre Workshop 3SH (title and course description changes)
An exploration of the collaborative process, students will develop and perform original work created by the group. Performance pieces will be based on a selected theme, starting with individual presentation of material and expanding to a group presentation developed through techniques of devising theatre. Utilizing methods such as improvisation, Viewpoints, spontaneous group writing, solo performance, transformation exercises, and story-telling, the class participants will focus on ensemble building, theatrical design and production, storytelling, music, media, art, movement, voice, and problem solving.

THR 388 Acting III: Period Styles 3SH (course description and prerequisite changes)
A studio course which focuses on the development and study of advanced acting techniques through analysis and performance of works from various theatrical periods. Emphasis will be placed on historical context, writing and performance styles, and the manners of various eras. Scenes selected from a variety of periods and styles will be performed and critiqued in class. Prerequisite: THR 281 and 282.

THR 390 Play Production 3SH (course description and prerequisite changes)
A study and application of the basic principles of the collaborative process in the production of plays: play selection, casting, directing, dramaturgy, stage design, scenery, lighting, costuming, stage management and publicity. Students will have practical application through participation in the production of a short theatre piece. Prerequisite: THR 181 and 182.

World Languages and Literature Course Changes

Arabic (Page 172)
ARB 101 Introductory Arabic I 3SH (course description and prerequisite changes)
A course for students who have no prior knowledge of Arabic. Aimed at introducing the four basic skills (listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing). Culture will be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: Level 1 language placement in Arabic. Special Info: Native speakers and students with 4 years of high school Arabic may not take for credit.

ARB 102 Introductory Arabic II 3SH (course description and prerequisite changes)
The second semester course in the Introductory Arabic sequence. Aimed at further developing the four basic skills (listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing). Culture will be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: ARB 101 OR Level 2 language placement in Arabic.

Chinese (Page 181)
CHI 162 Introductory Chinese I 3SH (course description and prerequisite changes)
A course for students who have no prior knowledge of Mandarin Chinese. Aimed at introducing the four basic skills (listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing). Culture will be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: Level 1 language placement in Chinese. Special Info: Native speakers and students with 4 years of high school Chinese may not take for credit.

CHI 164 Introductory Chinese II 3SH (course description and prerequisite changes)
The second semester course in the Introductory Mandarin Chinese sequence. Aimed at further developing the four basic skills (listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing). Culture will be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: CHI 162 OR Level 2 language placement.

French (Page 198)
FR 162 Introductory French I 3SH (course description and prerequisite changes)
A course for students who have no prior knowledge of French. Aimed at introducing the four basic skills (listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing). Culture will be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: Level 1 language placement in French. Special Info: Native speakers and students with 4 years of high school French may not take for credit.

FR 164 Introductory French II 3SH (course description and prerequisite changes)
The second semester course in the Introductory French sequence. Aimed at further developing the four basic skills (listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing). Culture will be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: FR 162 OR Level 2 language placement in French.

German (Page 200)
GER 162 Introductory German I 3SH (course description and prerequisite changes)
A course for students who have no prior knowledge of German. Aimed at introducing the four basic skills (listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing). Culture will be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: Level 1 language placement in German. Special Info: Native speakers and students with 4 years of high school German may not take for credit.

GER 164 Introductory German II 3SH (course description and prerequisite changes)
The second semester course in the Introductory German sequence. Aimed at further developing the four basic skills (listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing). Culture will be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: GER 162 OR Level 2 language placement in German.

Italian (Page 209)
IT 162 Introductory Italian I 3SH (course description and prerequisite changes)
A course for students who have no prior knowledge of Italian. Aimed at introducing the four basic skills (listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing). Culture will be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: Level 1 language placement in Italian. Special Info: Native speakers and students with 4 years of high school Italian may not take for credit.

IT 164 Introductory Italian II 3SH (course description and prerequisite changes)
The second semester course in the Introductory Italian sequence. Aimed at further developing the four basic skills (listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing). Culture will be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: IT 162 OR Level 2 language placement in Italian.

Portuguese (Page 225)
POR 162 Introductory Portuguese I 3SH (course description and prerequisite changes)
A course for students who have no prior knowledge of Portuguese. Aimed at introducing the four basic skills (listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing). Culture will be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: Level 1 language placement in Portuguese. Special Info: Native speakers and students with 4 years of high school Portuguese may not take for credit.

POR 164 Introductory Portuguese II 3SH (course description and prerequisite changes)
The second semester course in the Introductory Portuguese sequence. Aimed at further developing the four basic skills (listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing). Culture will be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: POR 162 OR Level 2 language placement in Portuguese.

Spanish (Page 235)
SPA 162 Introductory Spanish I 3SH (course description and prerequisite changes)
A course for students who have no prior knowledge of Spanish. Aimed at introducing the four basic skills (listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing). Culture will be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: Level 1 language placement in Spanish. Special Info: Native speakers and students with 4 years of high school Spanish may not take for credit.

SPA 164 Introductory Spanish II 3SH (course description and prerequisite changes)
The second semester course in the Introductory Spanish sequence. Aimed at further developing the four basic skills (listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing). Culture will be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite:
SPA 162 OR Level 2 language placement in Spanish.

SPA 196 Intermediate Language & Culture I 3SH (course description and prerequisite changes)
The first semester course in the Intermediate Spanish sequence. Focuses on reading, writing, oral comprehension and speaking through a study of Hispanic cultures. Prerequisite: SPA 164 OR Level 3 language placement in Spanish.

SPA 197 Intermediate Language & Culture II 3SH (course description and prerequisite changes)
The second semester course in the Intermediate Spanish sequence. Focuses on reading, writing, oral comprehension and speaking through a study of Hispanic cultures. Prerequisite: SPA 196 OR Level 4 language placement in Spanish.

Fall 2013

Ancell School of Business (Page 68)

Academic Probation and Suspension - Clarification

Ancell academic probation letters from the Dean are sent at the end of the semester to each first semester freshman with a grade-point average below 2.0 and to all other students with averages below 2.3. If you are placed on Ancell probation, you must meet with an at-risk adviser who will review your program requirements, course selections, credit loads, and other pertinent information and assist in developing a plan to improve your academic performance. You must continue to meet with your at-risk advisor as scheduled and make acceptable progress to achieving you plan goals.

The probationary period will commence the semester following the one for which the letter of probation was issued. The Dean will review the student’s activities during the period of probation.

Probation is for one semester only. If you do not make acceptable progress by the end of the first semester that you are on probation, you may be dismissed from the Ancell School for academic deficiency. Full-time students on probation should consider a semester course load of 12 credit hours and limit their participation in extra-curricular activities. Appeals to these policies should be made to the Ancell Dean who, for extenuating circumstances only, may waive the policy. Students dismissed from the Ancell School who are not on university suspension may apply to another WCSU School by filling out an application for change of major form.

Note: Individual Schools or programs may have standards for probation and dismissal from the school or program which are higher than the University’s standards. A student can be on probation or be dismissed from a School or program and still be in good standing at the University.

Education and Educational Psychology: Secondary Education (Pages 252-257)

Dr. Catherine O’Callaghan, Chair
ocallaghan@wcsu.edu
WS 250, Westside Classroom Building
(203) 837-3267
(203) 837-8413 (fax)

Ana Cangialosi, Department Secretary
cangialosia@wcsu.edu
WS 249, Westside Classroom Building
(203) 837-8510
(203) 837-8413 (fax)

Dr. Robin James, Secondary Education Program Coordinator
jamesr@wcsu.edu
WS 249, Westside Classroom Building
(203) 837-8676

Faculty

C. O’Callaghan, Chair J. Burke K. Burke
K. Campbell T. Canada J. Caruso
M. Daria M. Delcourt M. Gilles
R. James G. Lomas B. Rabe
D. Shaw M. Wilson

Education Department Mission Statement

The School of Professional Studies and the Education & Educational Psychology (E&EPY) Department are recognized by the Connecticut Department of Education (CSDE) as the principal units for the university with regard to teacher education preparation, serving to coordinate all the university’s teacher education degree and related programs.

The mission of the department is to prepare candidates for careers in teaching. We believe in initiating and maintaining professional relationships with the broader educational community and are committed to the continuous support and development of cooperative projects and services with area schools and community agencies. We embrace the broader mission of WCSU to empower students to “… attain the highest standards of academic achievement,… personal development, and ethical conduct.”

PROGRAM DISCLAIMER: Please note that Connecticut teacher certification regulations are subject to change due to legislative proposals and mandates; the information in the catalog may not reflect the most recent modifications in the WCSU Education program. Therefore, it is imperative that students check often with their advisors and attend Education Department information sessions for updates and new requirements.

Important note for all Music Education and Health Education majors: Only the Secondary Education degree program is detailed in this part of the WCSU Undergraduate Catalog.

  • For students seeking a Bachelor of Science degree in Health Education (B.S., PK – 12): Information for this education degree is listed in this catalog in the Health Promotion and Exercise Sciences section.
  • For students seeking a Bachelor of Science degree in Music Education (B.S., PK – 12): Information for this education degree is listed in this catalog in the Department of Music section.

Transfer Students

  1. Before meeting with Admissions or an advisor, transfer students should download, print and read the Education section from the online undergraduate catalog available on the WCSU website. Bring your program sheet to every meeting with an adviser.
  2. It may take more time for transfer students to complete the Secondary Education program at WCSU because some electives taken at other colleges/community colleges may not transfer into the Education major. Because of the demanding coursework in the Secondary Education program at WCSU, the number of courses taken as free electives is restricted. (Please consult Secondary Education program sheets for information related to free electives.)
  3. Grades from previous colleges or universities will be calculated when determining the cumulative 3.0 GPA or higher (subject to change based on state mandates) for admission to and retention in the Education program. However, in order to graduate as an Education major from WCSU, students must maintain a 3.0 GPA (subject to change) which is calculated solely on grades earned at WCSU.

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education (B.S.) (Grades 7–12)

Learning Outcomes

Candidates in the Secondary Education program must demonstrate achievement of the following learner outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate academic competence in their selected fields;
  2. Know the historical, social, economic, political, comparative and philosophical foundations of education;
  3. Understand the variety of patterns of human growth and development;
  4. Value and infuse cultural diversity;
  5. Demonstrate proficiency in and working knowledge of the Common Core State Standards that will establish what Connecticut’s public school students should know and be able to do as they progress through Grades K-12. The following links will guide secondary education majors to a clear understanding of the standards that shape the professional role of the Connecticut teacher:

    a) 2010 Common Core of Teaching (CCT)

    b) Connecticut Code of Professional Responsibility and

    c) 2010 Common Core of Teaching: Foundational Skills

  6. Demonstrate a spirit of inquiry, the use of critical thinking skills, and the habits of the reflective practitioner;
  7. Demonstrate the ability to incorporate appropriately the use of technology in instructional practices;
  8. Possess the knowledge and skills to successfully plan, implement, and evaluate classroom differentiated instruction to effectively maximize students’ learning potentials, including the use of instructional technology and literacy;
  9. Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge and skills for effectively assessing all school children’s learning in the classroom;
  10. Conduct themselves at all times in a professional and ethical manner as students, classroom teachers and as school leaders, and will embrace the professional values and commitments according to the Connecticut Code of Professional Responsibility;
  11. Possess classroom management skills that will assist students to take responsibility for their own behavior while maintaining a classroom that is conducive to learning;
  12. Continually improve their professional growth through the practice of inquiry and reflection as a classroom teacher and leader.

Program Summary

Secondary Education students will become dual majors: they will major in Education AND they will major in a content area offered within the School of Arts and Sciences; students must select an academic major in arts and sciences in addition to completing their professional education courses. Students must select one of the following academic majors.

Secondary Education (grades 7-12) with Arts and Sciences Majors in:

Biology
Chemistry
Earth Science
English
History
Mathematics
Social Sciences
Spanish

Secondary Education Content Area courses—See specific content area program sheets listed in online undergraduate program sheets on the WCSU website.

For content area specific questions, students should contact one the following Arts & Sciences Department Chairs:

Biology
Mitch Wagener, Chair
wagenerm@wcsu.edu
Science Building 145, Midtown campus
(203) 837-9790

Chemistry
Paula Secondo, Co-chair
secondop@wcsu.edu
Science Building 339, Midtown campus
(203) 837-8795

Russell Selzer, Co-chair
selzerr@wcsu.edu
Science Building 334, Midtown Campus
(203) 837-8448

Earth Science (Physics, Astronomy, Meteorology)
Dennis Dawson, Chair
dawsond@wcsu.edu
Science Building 278, Midtown campus
(203) 837-8671

English
Donald Gagnon, Co-chair
gagnond@wcsu.edu
Berkshire Hall 223, Midtown campus
(203) 837-3283

History
Jennifer Duffy, Co-chair
duffyj@wcsu.edu
Warner Hall 224, Midtown campus
(203) 837-3283

Mathematics
David Burns, Chair
burnsd@wcsu.edu
Higgins Hall 102F, Midtown campus
(203) 837-9346

Social Sciences
Oluwole Owoye, Co-chair
owoyeo@wcsu.edu
Warner Hall 204, Midtown campus
(203) 837-8456

Spanish (World Languages & Literature)
Alba Skar, Chair
skara@wcsu.edu
Berkshire Hall 215D, Midtown campus
(203) 837-8734

Exams: Required for Eligibility for State Teacher’s Certification

In addition to all the coursework required by the Education Department as well as the content area major, the following two exams are required:

PRAXIS I

  • Candidates must pass a Connecticut state mandated basic skills examination (PRAXIS I) in mathematics, reading and writing, or must obtain a waiver from the State Department of Education by presenting a combined score of 1,100 or more with no less than 450 on either the verbal or math subtest. If the SAT was administered prior to March 31, 1995, the candidate must present a combined score of 1,000 with at least a score of 400 on both the verbal and the math sections. It is the student’s responsibility to apply for this waiver. (Students may present a passing score on a similar test for another state with which Connecticut has certification reciprocity agreements.) Information concerning the PRAXIS I exam and waiver information is available in the Office of the Dean of Professional Studies, Midtown campus, 123 White Hall, (203-837-8575) or in the Office of E&EP in Westside 249. Call (203) 837-8510. Go online to the Educational Testing Service for detailed information about PRAXIS I.

PRAXIS II

  • Although not a graduation requirement, passing scores on appropriate PRAXIS II exams are necessary for program completion and subsequent recommendation for certification. The exam tests the essential subject area knowledge unique to each certification teaching area.
  • Secondary Education students must pass PRAXIS II before being admitted to the Professional Development Semester (PDS).
  • Students will not be recommended by WCSU for state teacher’s certification until passing scores are received and filed with the university’s teacher education certification officer, the Assistant Dean of the School of Professional Studies, who is located in White Hall 003C. Detailed information on PRAXIS II testing is available in the Office of E&EP in Westside 249. Additional information is available online from the Educational Testing Service.
  • Once a student has completed all his/her bachelor’s degree teacher certification requirements and passed PRAXIS II, the university’s teacher certification officer will file with the Connecticut State Department of Education (CDE) the necessary documents for the student’s receipt of CDE teacher certification.

Declaring an Education Major

At the end of the freshman year, students may apply to enter the Education Department. All freshman students who wish to become Education majors must demonstrate a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or higher (subject to change based on state mandates) upon completing 30 credits.

Students who fail to meet this GPA requirement will not be eligible to declare an Education major. Once accepted as Education majors, students must continue to maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher (subject to change based on state mandates) in order to remain in the Education program. Admission into the professional development and student teaching semesters during the senior year is also contingent on the 3.0 GPA or higher standard (subject to change based on state mandates).

Criteria for Professional Teacher Education Program Acceptance

The Secondary Education program at WCSU is rigorous and not all candidates applying for professional program admission are accepted. Students seeking admission to WCSU’s secondary teacher education certification programs must have completed and met the following criteria:

  • Pass a Connecticut state mandated basic skills examination (PRAXIS I). (See the detailed requirements for this exam in a previous section.)
  • Pass a Connecticut State Department of Education mandated subject area examination (PRAXIS II). (See the detailed requirements for this exam in a previous section.)
  • Present at least a 3.0 cumulative average (subject to change based on state mandates) for undergraduate courses taken prior to professional program acceptance (approximately 90 credits and reflecting courses in progress). All work done both at WCSU and other colleges will be considered in the computation of the cumulative grade point average. Note: Students with less than a cumulative 3.0 GPA (subject to change based on state mandates) will not be admitted to or retained in the program.
  • Complete the university’s general education requirements (42 semester-hour minimum) in communication, humanities, social and behavioral sciences, natural sciences and mathematics/computer science, and exercise science, as well as complete a writing intensive course. Students should refer to their concentration area program sheet for a list of specific courses that meet individual degree program criteria.
  • Complete the university’s general education requirements (42 semester-hour minimum) in communication, humanities, social and behavioral sciences, natural sciences and mathematics/computer science, and exercise science, as well as complete a writing intensive course. Students should refer to their concentration area program sheet for a list of specific courses that meet individual degree program criteria.
  • The courses below must be completed with a minimum grade of “B.” If a student receives grades in these three courses that are lower than a “B,” the student will be blocked from student teaching, with likely suspension and possible dismissal from the Education program.

      • HPX 215 Health Issues in the Schools (Grades PK-12)
      • ED 206 Introduction to Education
      • EPY 204 Adolescent Development in the School

ADDITIONAL PROGRAM ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

After all these criteria have been met, then students must fulfill these additional requirements:

  • Prepare and present an essay demonstrating a command of the English language and explaining the reasons for enrolling in the teacher education program, emphasizing experience relevant to teaching.
  • Present at least two letters of recommendation from persons outside the university who are able to testify to the candidate’s suitability as a prospective teacher.
  • Participate in an interview by a teacher education faculty team, which will assess candidate’s personal attributes and perceived teaching dispositions. There is also a performance based task during the interview that will assess candidate’s content knowledge and ability to orally communicate conceptual uderstanding effectively to others.

Submission Deadline Dates Applying for Professional Program (Professional Developmental Semester-PDS) Acceptance

  • Secondary education candidates may only apply in the spring semester of their junior year for the fall semester PDS.
  • Students must have all of their materials submitted to content area advisor and/or Arts and Sciences Department Chair. It is the student’s responsibility to insure that all materials are submitted by the deadline date of April 1. Once materials are received, students are contacted for an interview. Only complete files are reviewed for PDS.

Reapplication Process if Denied Program Acceptance

If the interview team from the professional program recommends that a student not be admitted to the teacher education program, the student may reapply for admission one semester after the notification of denial. Students have the right to review a copy of the completed interview form.

Student Teaching Process (see Student Teaching Handbook.)

  • Students are not eligible for student teaching course work unless they have received professional program acceptance.
  • During their last year, students enter the student teaching phase of the program. In order to register for student teaching, which is offered only during the spring semester, secondary education majors must present at least a 3.0 cumulative GPA (subject to change due to state mandates) for all courses taken in their academic and professional education course work. The student teaching requirement for secondary education majors consists of one full semester (70 contact days) of supervised teaching.
  • Secondary Student Teaching (ED 342) is offered only in the spring semester. Applications must be approved by the Arts & Sciences content area advisor and the Chair of the E&EPY department.
  • Applications must be filed in the Office of E&EPY by November 1 (available in Education Office, WS 249)
  • During the student teaching semester, students must concurrently register for ED 342 (Student Teaching) and ED 340 (Assessment of Teaching Strategies); students should not register for any other courses during the student teaching semester; students are also advised not to work during this semester due to the high time commitment required of planning lessons and grading student work after official school hours.
  • Students are responsible for providing their own transportation to and from the school to which they are assigned for student teaching.

Professional Education Fees

  • TK 20. Each student in the Education Program is required to obtain a Tk20 license. Tk20 is a comprehensive data management system used to collect, store, and analyze the results of selected assessments. These data are used to improve the degree and certificate programs in education and to provide evidence to external accrediting bodies that accreditation standards have been met. Information on obtaining this license is at http://cthe.wcsu.edu (see link in lower left hand corner). The license fee is $103.
  • Fingerprinting and Background Check. Effective July 1, 2010 the CT House Bill 6901 stipulates that local or regional boards of education must fingerprint individuals seeking placement in the district for the purpose of completing educator preparation requirements in nonpaid, noncertified positions (e.g., student teachers, interns, observations, etc). A criminal history background check is also required in accordance with chapter 166, sec 29-12a. Courses with clinical experiences that require proof of fingerprinting and background check include: ED 206, EPY 204, ED 342. Contact the Regional Education Service Center, Education Connection, at (203)791-1904 or (860)567-0863. There is a fingerprinting/background check fee payable to Education Connection.

WCSU Weather Information

Current Conditions in Danbury


Fair
Current Conditions

55.1° F
Feels like N/A°

Wind: 7MPH from the S
Humidity: N/A%
Pressure: 30 in.
Dew Point: N/A° F


Emergency / Weather Alert Information

The Emergency / Weather Alert will be posted on the WCSU home page any time an emergency or bad weather causes a delay, cancellation or early closing of the university.

Weather Alert Example

 Visit the Emergency / Weather Alert page

Greater Danbury 5-Day Forecast

Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Slight chance for a morning shower, partly sunny and pleasant.
Partly sunny and pleasant.
Mostly cloudy, chance for some showers.
Chance for morning rain then some afternoon sunshine.
Mostly sunny and mild.
36° / 59° 34° / 56° 36° / 43° 39° / 54° 33° / 54°